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Autumn Semester, Year 1 credits Music has accompanied the moving image since the inception of cinema. This course examines the aesthetics of screen music, moving through practices in the early years of cinema, to music in auteurist cinema (Hitchcock, Kubrick, Godard, etc) and present-day video work by both individual artists and mainstream practitioners.

You will consider musical issues such as developing compositional ideas, small and large ensemble writing, working with computers and electronics, and the significance of the voice in composition for screen media Music, Sound and Technology BSc (Hons) at City – an innovative degree to   Students at City's Music Department have recently undertaken placements at:   This enables you to tailor your work to your own interests.   in the form of a seminar presentation, a short essay, or creative and technical tasks   Michelle Masters..You will consider musical issues such as developing compositional ideas, small and large ensemble writing, working with computers and electronics, and the significance of the voice in composition for screen media.

In addition, you'll consider historical and technological developments and relate them to current practices in composition for interactive media.Your assessed submission will comprise: a direct creative project (composition) in a medium agreed in advance with your tutor, for example a film score or music for a gallery, website or game a critical commentary.Autumn Semester, Year 1 credits Composition develops understanding and practice of 20th century and contemporary musical methods and resources, but without stylistic restrictions, and with flexible outcomes (eg semi-notated and proportionally-notated work, graphic notation, conceptual/installation sonic work, performance art etc) Studying Digital Music and Sound Arts at Brighton places you in a city with a   Open days   We have a history of accepting outstanding students with strong portfolios and   An online portfolio consisting of a showreel of their own compositions or   development, management and presentation skills, and academic writing..Autumn Semester, Year 1 credits Composition develops understanding and practice of 20th century and contemporary musical methods and resources, but without stylistic restrictions, and with flexible outcomes (eg semi-notated and proportionally-notated work, graphic notation, conceptual/installation sonic work, performance art etc).You will focus on developing an extended piece of work through alternating group seminars and workshops.

In consultation with the course tutor, you will be encouraged to develop plans for an individual project early on in the course.The seminars will provide disciplinary context and insights into key techniques and examples of recent and earlier creative practice.The workshops will provide the opportunity to make presentations and to receive peer and tutor feedback.The submission will comprise a creative project (composition) in a medium agreed in advance with the tutor, and accompanied by a critical commentary.

Creative Project Summer Teaching, Year 1 credits Creative Project will comprise individual supervisions with a tutor who will be allocated to you once your proposed project has been agreed.

You will complete a creative project title proposal form at the end of the Spring term and this will be considered and agreed by the MA convenor in consultation with the appropriate tutor.Your choice of creative project will stem from your specialisms and interests as defined by the pathway you have taken in earlier semesters.Within the terms of the Creative Project, you can, subject to agreement by your tutor, undertake a portfolio of musical compositions; a portfolio of film and/or media compositions; a portfolio of studio compositions; a music theatre project; a sound environments project; or an independent project.The Creative Project must constitute a substantive example of creative practice; many such projects integrate an element of public performance and/or display; however, proposed materials for assessment must be agreed at the time of completing the creative project title proposal form (for example in the form of musical scores, sound/video files etc).Dissertation (Music MA) Summer Teaching, Year 1 credits This dissertation module will comprise individual supervisions with a tutor who will be allocated to you once your proposed topic has been agreed.

You will complete a dissertation title proposal form at the end of the spring term and this will be considered and agreed by the MA convenor in consultation with the appropriate tutor.Your choice of topic will stem from your specialisms and interests as defined by the pathway you have taken in earlier semesters.The dissertation must be 18,000 words long and it should demonstrate critical thinking and the ability to evaluate and analyse scholarship and music and sonic practices.It should articulate advanced insights into music and/or sonic art, and its wider context.Activist Media Practice Spring Semester, Year 1 credits Social movements have historically struggled to get their message reported clearly, accurately and effectively through the lens of mainstream media.

This has lead to the rise of alternative media practices and strategies to break through or unsettle the corporate and state-run media systems around the world.

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In order to challenge hegemonic discourses, activist media seeks to circumvent and dismantle traditional media's communicative strategies either through a disruptive aesthetic or through a reconfigured mode of civic engagement.Whether through radical leaflets, pirate radio, graffiti, protest music, performance art, activist videos, political documentaries, or social media and the internet, today's media landscape has evolved into a range of complex transnational networks that can be activated by independent counter-hegemonic media practices and expressions.This module asks you to learn about various forms of cultural resistance (through readings, screenings, lectures and discussions) in order to to formulate an effective form of activist media provocation Digital Music and Sound Arts BA Hons University of Brighton.This module asks you to learn about various forms of cultural resistance (through readings, screenings, lectures and discussions) in order to to formulate an effective form of activist media provocation.

This piece of activist media may take the form of a video, a website, site-specific performance, series of photographs, media prank, etc.

You will also be asked to write a reflective essay that contextualises the finished piece within the conceptual debates of the module.First Person Film (MA) Spring Semester, Year 1 credits First Person Film examines the ways in which film can be used as a personal, subjective medium, whether in fiction or documentary.Autobiographical or analytical, abstract or essayistic, professional or amateur, the first-person modality is increasingly present in all filmmaking practices.This module seeks to introduce you to theories of subjectivity whether from psychoanalysis, post-structuralism and/or literary theory considering the multiple theoretical incursions on the unity of the subject from Lacan to Butler and Nancy, and even the outright denial of the author (Barthes).We will explore questions of subjectivity such as: what constitutes a subject? from what position does s/he speak? and what or who is the 'I' that speaks? From this will arise further questions regarding the address: to whom does s/he speak and to what avail? who is being interpellated as audience? and how is identification constructed? The module will survey a range of first-person filmmaking, including the fictional autobiography, artist's experimental films, first-person documentary, the essay film, the home movie and the proliferation of YouTube direct address.

Interactive Project Development Spring Semester, Year 1 credits The module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of interactive media projects from initial concept to distribution -- with close analyses of how the different stages of a project are related, planned and connected to other media.You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the creation of a test or pilot project.The module will aid you in the development of the tools required to conceptually frame your interactive practice and help them communicate clearly and critically.During the module you will be given time to explore media projects in a variety of media and to consider the implications of those projects for your own work.You will be asked to study and discuss a number of different methods for the critical appraisal and theorisation of creative media projects across genres and will be expected to show initiative in undertaking a wide range of research to help develop your ideas and skills (viewing, listening, reading, observing, testing of techniques, etc).

The module is taught through a combination of presentations by the module tutor as well as individual students, group-critiques and one-on-one critiques.The module uses an application form containing questions drawn from industry and research council funding and commisioning calls as a structure for you to focus and present your work.At the end of the module, you will produce a proposal in the form of a contextualising essay answering all the questions on the application form, a work plan, a pilot project demonstrating the style and forms of itneraction in your project and a journal demonstrating how you have thought through you ideas, what has emerged from the discussion and in-class critiques.This combination of essay and pilot will be the framework for you self-directed project.Media Histories and Cultural Change × Spring Semester, Year 1 credits This module explores key changes in the media over the past 120 years and how these have both reflected and shaped our cultural life in profound ways.

By focusing on the emergence of 'new' media, such as radio and cinema in the early 20th century, television in the later 20th century and the internet on the eve of the 21st century, the module looks at key transitional moments in electronic media forms.It assesses how these media were the products of the cultural life of the time and how they subsequently enriched or, arguably, damaged this broader culture.The module is arranged in three sections that: Explores the emergence of broadcasting and cinema between the 1890s and the 1930s, and discusses them in the context of new ideas in America and Europe about communication, mass culture and social psychology, and in the context of new artistic ideas such as modernism.Explores the rise and spread of television between the 1940s and the 1990s, and discusses it in the context of wider debates about visual culture, the consumer society, the Cold War, the witnessing of global media events, national identity and globalisation Tackles the spread since the 1990s of internet and social media, discussing them in the context of fierce international debates about the changing nature of knowledge and literacy and in particular the alleged creation of a 'distracted' mindset and a superficial and banal popular cultureIn drawing on specific case studies at each stage, the module aims to enhance your skills in using historical evidence, including written and audio-visual archives and oral history testimony, to develop arguments about media.

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Media, Culture and Communication Spring Semester, Year 1 credits The module offers you the chance to explore at an advanced level a number of principal theories and methods within a cultural studies approach to media studies, and to consider how these shape the ways we might think about and research particular media industries, forms and issues.

The module begins with a focus on questions concerning media production, distribution and consumption.In the latter part of the module, we pay attention to a variety of methodological approaches which draw attention in particular to different ways of conceptualising the relation between the media and concepts like subjectivity, identity, perception and experience Music and Sound Recording (Tonmeister) BSc (Hons) or BMus (Hons) – 2019 entry   As part of this course you have the option to complete a Professional  .In the latter part of the module, we pay attention to a variety of methodological approaches which draw attention in particular to different ways of conceptualising the relation between the media and concepts like subjectivity, identity, perception and experience.

The theory element aims to introduce you to the key thinkers, traditions and debates in media and cultural studies and contributing disciplines.You will investigate media as institutions and systems of representation and explore problems of production and consumption in a variety of social and geo-political contexts.You will be encouraged to prepare informal presentations and to engage in discussion with other members of the seminar group.

Each week there will also be a short introduction to the following week’s topic in the lecture given by members of the Media and Film faculty.The research element aims to develop a systematic and critical understanding of the practical, epistemological and ethical issues involved in conducting different kinds of media and cultural research camin.ir/powerpoint-presentation/need-to-buy-a-custom-design-powerpoint-presentation-51-pages-14025-words-high-school-single-spaced-online.The research element aims to develop a systematic and critical understanding of the practical, epistemological and ethical issues involved in conducting different kinds of media and cultural research.It also aims to make you methodologically self-conscious in your own research and written work.Music and the Media of Performance (Practice) × Spring Semester, Year 1 credits During the past fifty years the parameters of musical performance have expanded enormously.For John Cage all musical performance was inherently theatrical since it engaged both eye and ear.

The visual aspect of musical performance, and the relationship of music to the spatial and to the embodied, has often been overlooked, and has led composers such as, eg, Cage himself, Mauricio Kagel and Heiner Goebbels to explore the extended theatricality of musical performance in directions beyond opera.Other artists like Meredith Monk, Philip Glass and Robert Wilson have restored the term 'opera' to refer to music theatre works that reconfigure the traditional media of opera (music, language, voice, sound, body, space, image) in new ways.More recently muscians such as Michel van der Aa have incorporated sonic and visual media in a live performance context.The module will examine both theories and practices of experimental music theatre and multi-media performance through critical and practical engagement with the ideas that lie behind such practices.

The module will be assessed by an essay, through which you will demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of key theories and practices in experimental music theatre or multi-media performance.

Music and the Media of Performance (Theory) × Spring Semester, Year 1 credits During the past fifty years the parameters of musical performance have expanded enormously.For John Cage all musical performance was inherently theatrical since it engaged both eye and ear.The visual aspect of musical performance, and the relationship of music to the spatial and to the embodied, has often been overlooked, and has led composers such as, eg, Cage himself, Mauricio Kagel and Heiner Goebbels to explore the extended theatricality of musical performance in directions beyond opera.Other artists like Meredith Monk, Philip Glass and Robert Wilson have restored the term 'opera' to refer to music theatre works that reconfigure the traditional media of opera (music, language, voice, sound, body, space, image) in new ways.More recently musicians such as Michel van der Aa have incorporated sonic and visual media in a live performance context.

The module will examine both theories and practices of experimental music theatre and multi-media performance through critical and practical engagement with the ideas that lie behind such practices.The module will be assessed by an essay, through which you will demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of key theories and practices in experimental music theatre or multi-media performance.

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Music Production in Context Spring Semester, Year 1 credits This module will introduce you to a broad set of skills in modern music production including issues such as pre-production, studio production, mix and final mastered product.These issues will be discussed in the context of analysis of current and historical practices in music production referring to writer/practitioners such as Mick Brown, John Borwick and Bruce Bartlet.The importance of planning will be stressed but technical aspects such as microphone placement, drum recording and vocal recording will also be considered Introduction to the Masters Scottish Music in Scotland at the Royal   you to refine and extend your musicianship in the context of your own aspirations. Most importantly, we have designed it so that you take ownership of the   staff, you'll get the opportunity to learn from visiting artists and academics from all over the world..

The importance of planning will be stressed but technical aspects such as microphone placement, drum recording and vocal recording will also be considered.

The module will critically examine the balance between interpretation and constraints placed on production and creativity by industry.You will produce a musical work in recorded form that gives evidence of knowledge of production methods as well as embodying a creative and critical response to the particular constraints of a music production brief.You are required to write a 1,500-word commentary as part of your portfolio demonstrating advanced understanding of theories and practices of music production.New Moving Screens Autumn Semester, Year 1 credits Looking at the evolution of mobile and location-based technologies, this module investigates the emergent fields of pervasive media and locative media need to buy an information technology case study British two hours single spaced.New Moving Screens Autumn Semester, Year 1 credits Looking at the evolution of mobile and location-based technologies, this module investigates the emergent fields of pervasive media and locative media.You will investigate the ways that mobile technologies and portable media have evolved to become defining elements of pervasive and locative media.

You will explore cultural and creative activities in the fields, including (but not limited to) artistic practice utilising mobile phones and gps devices, and you will create your own projects utilising pervasive and/or locative media.While leading to the production of a creative project, work done on this module will be heavily informed by study of the key critical debates and historical moments surrounding the evolution pervasive and locative media.Promotional Culture Spring Semester, Year 1 credits This module is not about advertising per se or the marketing 'tools' usually suggested by the term promotion but an exploration of 1) how advertising has crossed over into domains beyond the commercial with an alleged collapse of boundaries, and 2) how branding seems increasingly to take over aspects of the lifeworld.According to Andrew Wernick, from whom the term promotional culture is borrowed, advertising 'has come to shape not only culture's symbolic and ideological contents, but also its ethos, texture and constitution' (1991: viii).The module is about understanding contemporary promotional culture via a grasp of historical developments.

These include the development of the capitalist market, the rise of a sign-culture and women as key consumers.The module opens up theoretical ideas and debate via a series of case studies which may include 'the department store', 'spin', 'celebrity politics', PR journalism, 'the spectacular university', 'the branded self'.The questions it is concerned with include: does it matter that commercial advertising has been overtaken by branding and promotion extending into politics, public services, the arts and charity organisations? Does this mark a problematic undermining of a 'public sphere'? Or can the 'inauthenticity' of promotional culture be democratically enabling in so far its practices lay open the malleability of social life? Do the developments of other modernities (eg.South/East Asia) suggest we should think about the rise of the market, branding and promotion in different ways than is suggested in a Western literature? Research Methods for Creative Practice × Introduction Welcome to the MMus/MA (Scottish Music).You begin your postgraduate studies with the core of your musical personality – the skills, understandings and attitudes that define you as a traditional musician or piper – already established; your postgraduate studies should nurture that existing artistic personality so that you can really make a difference in the fields in which you choose to work.

The programme offers advanced training to talented traditional musicians from a diverse range of undergraduate degrees or their equivalent, allowing you to refine and extend your musicianship in the context of your own aspirations.Most importantly, we have designed it so that you take ownership of the learning process throughout the degree and beyond it, whether in the professional world or in higher studies (such as a PhD).Our staff are professional performers, composers, and scholars of Scottish traditional music with active careers.They understand the challenges that you’ll face in your own career and can provide help and advice as you progress.As well as working with our elite core staff, you’ll get the opportunity to learn from visiting artists and academics from all over the world.

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There’s a great atmosphere in the department and the Conservatoire as a whole; it’s a close-knit community where you end up performing and gigging with other students and staff, and making friends for life.As for professional and institutional collaborations, we work closely with the National Piping Centre, Sabhal M r Ostaig and the Celtic Connections festival in delivering a varied and vocationally robust experience for its students.We also possess long-standing exchange agreements with a host of European and North American universities, allowing you to study for a term or year abroad – including East Tennessee State University’s world-famous bluegrass and old-time music programme, Sibelius Academy (Finland) and the Irish Music and Dance department of the University of Limerick, among many others Masters Scottish Music Programme Postgraduate Introduction.We also possess long-standing exchange agreements with a host of European and North American universities, allowing you to study for a term or year abroad – including East Tennessee State University’s world-famous bluegrass and old-time music programme, Sibelius Academy (Finland) and the Irish Music and Dance department of the University of Limerick, among many others.

Piping tuition on the MMus is delivered in collaboration with the National Piping Centre, which is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence in Highland Bagpipe teaching.Introduction Welcome to the MMus/MA (Scottish Music).

You begin your postgraduate studies with the core of your musical personality – the skills, understandings and attitudes that define you as a traditional musician or piper – already established; your postgraduate studies should nurture that existing artistic personality so that you can really make a difference in the fields in which you choose to work.The programme offers advanced training to talented traditional musicians from a diverse range of undergraduate degrees or their equivalent, allowing you to refine and extend your musicianship in the context of your own aspirations.Most importantly, we have designed it so that you take ownership of the learning process throughout the degree and beyond it, whether in the professional world or in higher studies (such as a PhD).Our staff are professional performers, composers, and scholars of Scottish traditional music with active careers.They understand the challenges that you’ll face in your own career and can provide help and advice as you progress.

As well as working with our elite core staff, you’ll get the opportunity to learn from visiting artists and academics from all over the world.There’s a great atmosphere in the department and the Conservatoire as a whole; it’s a close-knit community where you end up performing and gigging with other students and staff, and making friends for life.As for professional and institutional collaborations, we work closely with the National Piping Centre, Sabhal M r Ostaig and the Celtic Connections festival in delivering a varied and vocationally robust experience for its students.We also possess long-standing exchange agreements with a host of European and North American universities, allowing you to study for a term or year abroad – including East Tennessee State University’s world-famous bluegrass and old-time music programme, Sibelius Academy (Finland) and the Irish Music and Dance department of the University of Limerick, among many others.Piping tuition on the MMus is delivered in collaboration with the National Piping Centre, which is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence in Highland Bagpipe teaching.

Programme Outline The MMus programme is made up of four modules.As well as incorporating your one-to-one lessons, the Principal Study offers a range of assessment choices, including solo, collaborative and studio recording options.In the second year you will undertake an independent project, allowing you to create your own unique assessment around a particular area of specialism.The Supporting Studies module offers a range of experiences in support of your principal study, including performance classes, workshops, masterclasses, rehearsals and concerts.

The programme is completed by the Approaches to Critical Artistry module, in which you carry out a practice-based research project, and up to two Elective modules in each year of study.

The structure of the one-year MA programme is similar, including Principal Study, Supporting Studies, Approaches to Critical Artistry and the option to take one Elective.This programme is completed by the Negotiated Study module, offering the opportunity to pursue an significant period of independent study in an area of your own choosing.Full details of the structure of both the MMus and MA degrees are in the MMus-MA Guide for Applicants which can be found at /studyhere/how-to-apply/music/.

Staff and masterclasses Scottish Music The interview will explore the applicant’s understanding of the demands of the programme, knowledge of the repertoire, aspects of performance practice, performance experience and attitudes, and professional aspirations.Audition Performance of a programme of approximately 15 minutes on the principal study.

Applicants with questions to do with accompaniment should contact the Head of Department, but in all cases, the applicant is responsible for providing their own accompanist This MMus builds on our international reputation in the popular music field, as seen   extend your own practice through options in sonic and studio art, advanced music   We have an international reputation and proven leadership in the field,   This Masters develops your technical and interpretive abilities as a performer,  .Applicants with questions to do with accompaniment should contact the Head of Department, but in all cases, the applicant is responsible for providing their own accompanist.

Applicants are asked to give brief spoken introductions to each item performed and their own compositions may be included.Applicants will be asked to undertake a brief sight-reading test and an aural test MMuss Music Masters Humanities University of Southampton.Applicants will be asked to undertake a brief sight-reading test and an aural test.In the latter, the applicant will be asked to reproduce a short piece sung or played to them by the panel specialist MMuss Music Masters Humanities University of Southampton.In the latter, the applicant will be asked to reproduce a short piece sung or played to them by the panel specialist.How to apply Before applying we recommend that you follow our Applicant Guide journey which provides all the essential information regarding entry requirements, and the full application and audition process.

Making your application Applications for the MMus/MA programme should be made through the UCAS Conservatoires website.There is a UCAS application fee of £25 (which is in addition to the audition fee) which allows you up to six choices of programme of study.Entry requirements Normally a good Honours (at least 2.2) degree, or its overseas equivalent, in a subject area relevant to the demands of the programme Entrance to the Conservatoire is based on talent, potential and ability, therefore consideration will be given to relevant experience which is deemed to compensate for any traditional education.We accept a wide range of qualification, including international qualifications.

If you wish to check the suitability of your qualification/experience, please contact [email protected] .English Language The language of study is English.Applicants whose first language is not English will be required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.We accept the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).Other equivalent English Language qualifications may be considered, please contact [email protected] for more information.

5 in each component Audition Requirements Fees and scholarships MMus Scottish Music (2 years) UK/EU Students – £8,313 MMus Scottish Music (2 years) International (non-EU) – £16,290 MA Scottish Music (1 year) UK/EU Students – £11,280 MA Scottish Music (1 year) International (non-EU) – £19,581 Scottish/EU students New Scottish and EU domiciled students may be eligible for a Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan.All eligible students will be able to apply directly to Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for a non-means tested loan of up to £3,400.See the SAAS website for further details of the PSAS scheme.

Scottish domiciled postgraduate students on eligible courses can also apply for a Postgraduate Living Cost Loan up to £4,500 towards living expenses.This is in addition to the existing loan available towards the cost of their tuition fees.Scholarships Any potential student who auditions for a place at the Royal Conservatoire will automatically be considered for a scholarship.

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They are awarded on a combination of talent, potential and financial need.More information about Scholarships is available here Sources of external funding For more information about alternative funding sources, including external scholarships and bursaries, please visit here.

The Conservatoire’s International and Student Experience team are available to advise and assist applicants and current students in respect of queries about funding your studies at the Conservatoire 7 Mar 2017 - Always look out for flaws in arguments – and that includes your own.   students are under to get top grades for their coursework these days.   Then when I come to write, I have all of my material.   Essays for sale: the booming online industry in writing academic work to order   And finally, the introduction..The Conservatoire’s International and Student Experience team are available to advise and assist applicants and current students in respect of queries about funding your studies at the Conservatoire.

Please email or telephone +44 (0)141 270 8281/ +44 (0)141 270 8223 for further information.Graduate destinations The Royal Conservatoire’s MMus graduates work professionally in orchestras, ensembles and opera houses in the UK and abroad The BA (Hons) Music course at Lincoln is a contemporary, industry-focused degree   As well as working with other musicians, students have the opportunity to  .Graduate destinations The Royal Conservatoire’s MMus graduates work professionally in orchestras, ensembles and opera houses in the UK and abroad.Many build portfolio careers, combining part-time and freelance performance with teaching, community engagement, and work in allied areas such as music administration The BA (Hons) Music course at Lincoln is a contemporary, industry-focused degree   As well as working with other musicians, students have the opportunity to  .Many build portfolio careers, combining part-time and freelance performance with teaching, community engagement, and work in allied areas such as music administration.Some noted alumni of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s MMus (Scottish Music) programme include Hayley Hewitt (class of 2013), who went on to win the Scottish Harp Society of America’s 2013 National Championship , and William Woodson, noted American piper, pipe-maker and innovator.

Facilities Scottish Music is based, appropriately enough, at the heart of the Royal Conservatoire, occupying its centrally-located Studio C recording, rehearsal and teaching area.The Royal Conservatoire’s Studio C is a large yet intimate space at the heart of the Renfrew Street campus, functioning as the living hub of BA Scottish Music activity at the Royal Conservatoire (including band studies, group projects, masterclasses and informal sessions) and providing state of the art rehearsal, recording, PA and storage facilities.Practice accommodation in the Royal Conservatoire’s Renfrew Street campus has increased prodigiously in recent years, accommodating all types of musical activity, from solo to band, singing to piping.The National Piping Centre offers further purpose-designed practice space for Highland piping students.Areas within the building have been wifi-enabled and all students have access to the network using their own laptops and portable devices.

IT provision in the Whittaker Library has increased in recent years to accommodate 16 PC workstations, (incorporating Sibelius 7), bringing the total open access student PC provision to 52 machines (and counting).This is further enhanced by the Royal Conservatoire’s Digital Training Unit and Language Lab facilities.Students have access to over 70 relevant e-journals and 14 electronic databases and online archives, including Tobar an Dualchais / Kist o Riches, HOTBED, Oxford Music Online, IPA Source, JStor and Naxos.The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s Whittaker Library continues to support Scottish Music students via a dedicated full-time Music Librarian and a full-time Performance Librarian.Just as the Scottish Music Department occupies the heart of the Conservatoire, so the Conservatoire occupies the heart of Glasgow, a UNESCO City of Music.

Students can take advantage of our central location to avail themselves of the National Piping Centre, the Scottish Music Centre at City Halls, the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall and a teeming network of folk music sessions at pubs throughout the city.